Our mentorship journey Siobhan Atherley and Kerry Jordan-Daus

Siobhan Atherley is a senior lecturer at Canterbury Christ University who took part in Aurora London in 2017. Her mentor, Kerry Jordan-Daus is head of UK and International Partnerships and is on the Canterbury Christ Church Athena Swan Senior Implementation Team and the Faculty of Education Athena Swan champion. Here they take the time to reflect on their experiences and learnings as a mentor and mentee. Their relationship demonstrates conversations can provide clarity and motivation in facilitating learning and development.

Siobhan: Black

Kerry: Purple

Siobhan: I am a senior lecturer with many years experience working in higher education institutions with a range of multi professional health and social care undergraduate and post graduate students and learners. This also included working as a tutor in the Open University and as a non-medical general practice programme director in a Deanery.

I applied for Aurora as I thought it would be an opportunity to help me navigate my way in my professional career and become energised as I was feeling ‘stuck’ in my career. I felt a lack of momentum which I recognised as a hindrance in my motivation to move forward into leadership positions. For me leadership isn’t about being in charge but about being a visionary and enabling different perspectives to be shared, in bringing together talents and ideas from others. In order to shape ideas and influence change I felt that I needed to gain a leadership role but I felt stuck, and hoped that Aurora would help facilitate the personal development I needed. My successful application to Aurora gave me the learning space to reflect and challenge and start to examine how I would integrate my prior knowledge, new knowledge and future knowledge into my work as an academic.

Kerry: I am an experienced senior leader in the university’s Faculty of Education and a member of the university’s Senior Leadership Group. I am new to mentoring Aurorans but I do have significant experience of mentoring as part of my professional role as a teacher educator.

I have undertaken a number of professional development courses to support my own learning as a mentor and coach. Most recently I completed a Manager as Coach Staff Development programme through our university. I am a Department for Education designated coach and currently coach two school leaders. I find coaching to be professionally enriching. I am in a place in my own professional life where I feel I can share my own leadership journey, but I am also in a place where I want to continue to learn and grow as a leader so being a mentor and coach is also about my own learning.

I am a member of the university Athena Swan Senior Implementation Team and the Faculty of Education Athena Swan champion. I am currently completing a Doctorate in Education Leadership with a focus on gender and authentic leadership so mentoring Siobhan seemed like the right fit.

Siobhan: Due to ill-health my first mentor was unable to continue in the role. This was a great loss to me as I find her vision and articulation of the position of women in society including the workplace energising. I was grateful to her visual image and description of ‘sweeping rubbish away’ when I discussed how stuck I was feeling. It gave me permission to do just that and how important it is to move forward in a positive way. The absence of a mentor for a significant part of Aurora contributed to some of my frustrations but I was determined to get beyond this.

I realised how important the mentor was in the Aurora learning and professional development process and I chased for a replacement. Kerry was my second mentor and we met when the programme ended. The meetings took the shape of constructive coaching conversations facilitated by Kerry. With these coaching sessions, my ideas took shape, my energy increased, and I determined to change my views. I got out my broom!

At our first meeting, I admitted to Kerry that I was tired of feeling professionally stuck. For me this was a brave admission as being open might not be seen as a positive strength. I think self-awareness is important and I know many of us are wary of being honest.

Aurora set out an excellent session on a holistic presentation of ourselves. A common theme was that women are not forth coming in expressing their views in meetings for example and that confidence and assertiveness is an issue. Kerry my mentor was not judgemental and provides a space for honest reflection on thoughts and feelings and a solution focused approach to developing skills in for example assertiveness and confidence.

As busy academics, protected time for reflection is vital in maintaining flexibility and Aurora provided this space. Now, mentorship provides a support system and a vehicle for me to critically reflect on my scope of work both as an individual and as a team member. The first meeting was crucial in setting the scope and objectives for enabling me to help myself, feel more in control of where I would like to go, and how I would do this.

I believe passionately in the impact Action Learning Sets can have and although ours was less effective (we only met once perhaps owing to our geographical spread), I have continued to meet with one of the members of the group. I see this informal networking as a real benefit of Aurora.

Kerry: I met Siobhan at the end of her formal Aurora Programme. It was evident to me that she had really engaged with the messages and was determined not to ‘sit’ and wait but to put herself out there. But at that first meeting I heard her frustrations but I also heard her determination. Using the GROW Coaching Model enabled me to support Siobhan to see that there were options and that it was in her grasp to do something to secure the leadership role that she really aspired to. 

I really enjoyed the opportunity to put into practice some of the new techniques that I had been introduced to as part of my own coaching programme and I encouraged Siobhan to evaluate my mentoring/coaching approach.

Research into women in leadership (Blackmore and Sachs, 2007, Coleman 2011, Fitzgerald 2014,) highlight the diversity of women’s leadership life trajectory. Both Siobhan and I spent our first meeting talking about our lives. Work is important to both of us. It gives us a sense of identity. But our stories do not follow a neat pattern. Families, children, health all impact on our journeys. We talked about these experiences as empowering and not limiting. We found ourselves going back to history and reflected on those women who are ‘hidden from history’ (Rowbotham 1973) as our heroines.

Siobhan: It was energising discussing with Kerry the influential work undertaken by women writers and researchers in the past that we both had read, and how their reflections continue to be relevant today. For example we talked about Ann Oakley who explored women’s work both paid (the public sphere) and unpaid (in the home). I felt a sense of connection with my mentor discussing women’s literature as this aspect of women’s history in literature can be neglected and unknown. Certainly there is debate around the word ‘feminism’ and its current relevance. It would be useful to explore the juxtaposition between academic, current social and historical definitions of the private and public sphere of women and work in society, and apply to leadership in general.

Since I completed Aurora I have been appointed as cohort coordinator for the medically themed MSc pathway for clinical fellows in the Institute of Medical Science. I have also led a project to include a range of health and social care professionals in practice education and I am now part of a project exploring the facilitation of learning in the workplace for all learners across all levels and programmes. Finally, I have been invited to contribute to a proposed book exploring practice learning and I am planning to apply for Senior Fellowship of the Higher Education Academy. Within less than a year I have achieved some of the leadership space that I aspired to at the beginning of the process.

Kerry: Our mentor/mentee relationship is built upon honesty and trust. This continues to grow which is a natural part of the process of development. We have continued to meet, and the mentoring continues in an informal way. Perhaps it’s not mentoring anymore but I like to think I am providing ongoing professional support and a bit of space, which we all need and pretending otherwise feels dishonest. Both Siobhan and I are committed to our own learning and the relationship has enabled us to both continue to learn and grow as leaders. For me, it has also been about my learning as a coach and a mentor.

Siobhan: Putting together this blog has been another significant part of our developing mentee/mentor relationship – providing scaffolding to support reflection and reflexity.  Kerry and I continue to meet – I think this could continue for sometime!

Siobhan and Kerry’s blog post forms part of our mentor and mentee blogs. There are two more currently online: 


Aurora is the Leadership Foundation’s women-only leadership development programme. Aurora was created in 2013 in response to our own research which highlighted women’s under-representation in senior leadership positions and identified actions that could be taken to address this.

Dates and locations for Aurora 2017-18 are available here.

This year we are encouraging Aurora mentees and their mentors to attend the Aurora Conference 2018 on Thursday 7 June. Book now. 

Our mentorship journey: Karen Twomey and Val Cummins

Karen Twomey is a Researcher at Tyndall National Institute, Cork who took part in Aurora in Dublin in 2014-15. Karen chose, Val Cummins, Senior Lecturer at University College Cork to be her mentor for the duration of the programme and the relationship continues to this day. We asked Karen and Val to reflect on their relationship as a mentee and mentor.

Firstly, tell us a little about yourself

Karen: My name is Karen Twomey, and I participated in the Aurora Course in 2014-2015. I’m a mother to one year old boy/girl twins and, I’m a researcher in autonomous chemical sensing systems at Tyndall National Institute, Cork, Ireland. My research activity encompasses sensors, mixed-signal instrumentation, and signal processing and data interpretation algorithms.

Val: My name is Val Cummins. I had the pleasure of being invited to work with Karen on her Aurora Programme. My background and track record is in leading research with impact, including fostering innovation for the sustainable development of the global ocean economy. The sea has been a focal point for most of my career; from the formative years as a zoologist working on the humble periwinkle, to managing a large research centre, directing a maritime and energy cluster, and most recently as an academic in UCC. My leadership in the Blue Economy was recognised by a number of awards, including an Eisenhower Fellowship in 2012. I am married to Ken and we have three, beautiful young daughters.

How did you approach the process of mentorship?

Karen: I went into the mentorship process not fully knowing what I wanted to get out of it. However, I did know that I wanted a mentor who was a great public speaker and who understood the R&D environment. Val was suggested to me as a suitable mentor by the UCC Aurora Champion. I contacted Val over email and after our initial meeting, we agreed to meet face-to-face once a month with contact in between over email or text message.

Val: When I was contacted directly by Karen, I was struck by her commitment to the Aurora programme, and it was a no-brainer for me to agree to a mentoring relationship. I was fascinated by her work and achievements to date. We arranged to meet regularly. Our initial meetings were well structured, with clear objectives and actions to pursue. At the same time, it was natural for us to be very informal, which helped us to get to know each other better.

What has been your biggest learning from the process?

Karen: I think the biggest learning for me has been the realisation of how powerful having an outside perspective can be. You can start to get tunnel vision, especially when working in the same workplace for 15 years.  Having the right mentor can show you your potential, can give you a push to try new things. For instance, with Val’s help and encouragement, I applied for a Science Foundation Ireland Industry fellowship, which allows an exchange between academia and industry. I’m now on a one year secondment from Tyndall and am working in a corporate R&D environment.

Val: My learning from the process is that you can never underestimate the importance of mutual support between women in the work place. It is not a linear process flowing from mentor to mentee. It works both ways. Karen’s focus and capability inspires me.

Val, what inspired you to become a mentor?

Val: I was inspired by Karen, in her approach to me, which encouraged me to believe that this would be a valuable process. I was also inspired by my experience with my own personal mentors, who have been generous to a fault with their time and advice which they have provided unconditionally.

I had my head in the sand for many years in relation to the need to advocate for equality in the workplace. Through personal experiences I have come to appreciate the importance of this issue. Mentorship provides an important mechanism for women to provide the support needed to encourage their counterparts to break through the many glass ceiling that prevail in working environments.

Karen, have you ever been a mentor yourself?

Karen: I haven’t previously been a mentor but I would like to pay it forward to other women pursuing a career in STEM by passing on what I have learnt from Val and from my own experiences as a research scientist.

Karen, what was the best piece of advice you received from Val?

Karen: The best piece of advice that I got from Val was to have a can-do attitude and to give new things a shot.

Val, what piece of advice would you give an aspiring woman leader?

Val: My advice is that what constitutes ‘success’ is personal to every individual. Capability, intellect, talent, and good luck are all factors that can help an aspiring leader to achieve successful outcomes. However, ultimately, success, or if you like, a sense of fulfilment and wellbeing, are contingent on relationships. Taking the time to relate to others, and to value your colleagues, is an imperative. It’s a cliché, but there is no ‘I’ in ‘team’.  Aspiring leaders need to understand how to build and maintain vibrant teams.

Finally, for you both: do you have an inspiring woman leader, and if so, who

Karen: I am very inspired by Professor Linda Doyle, who is Director of CONNECT/CTVR Research Centre in Dublin and Professor of Engineering and The Arts in Trinity College Dublin, the University of Dublin. She is a wonderfully passionate speaker and is an expert in her field yet is completely unassuming.

Val: It is hard to single out any one individual, as there are many characteristics among many female leaders that are inspiring. For example, Ellen MacArthur, is an amazing example of someone with vision and an indefatigable determination to succeed. As a professional sailor, she broke the world record for the fastest solo circumnavigation of the globe in 2005. Her autobiography, which I just re-read, is incredibly compelling. Since she retired from professional sailing, she founded the Ellen MacArthur Foundation, to promote the Circular Economy, prompted, in part, by her acute awareness of debris in the ocean. In business, Sheryl Sandberg stands out, for her communication skills. I admire her for her honesty, and in her ability to use her influence to tackle the issue of gender equality in the workplace. Angela Merkel also deserves a mention, as a political leader committed to stability in a difficult time for the European project.

 


Aurora is the Leadership Foundation’s women-only leadership development programme. Aurora was created in 2013 in response to our own research which highlighted women’s under-representation in senior leadership positions and identified actions that could be taken to address this.

Dates, locations and booking for Aurora 2017-18 are available here.

Reflections on Aurora

The Leadership Foundation’s former International Projects Manager, Hannah Phung shares her thoughts on year one of the Aurora programme.

One of the Aurora cohorts

An Aurora year one cohort

I’ve been on personal development programmes before including a Future Leaders’ programme and I benefited from each one, but from the outset, there was something different with Aurora. I don’t know if it is because of Ginnie’s vision for it or if the idea of 200 women in a room triggered something, but I definitely wanted to participate.

I enjoyed taking part in Aurora with a group of LF colleagues. The camaraderie of going through the process together meant we shared experiences and became closer as we opened up to each other. This openness and willingness to share was a major characteristic of Aurora. It meant some of the benefit came from the presentations and speakers but most came from the experiences, knowledge, advice, support, questions and willingness to listen. Total strangers, delegates I had only just met gave to me and I could give back as we shared our challenges. I’ve not experienced such openness on a programme before. It wasn’t just at the tables we sat at or my action learning group it was wherever I was in the Aurora environment. I really did not expect such openness and bonding between strangers, especially in the space of a few hours. A culture is created in Aurora that makes this happen.

The four Aurora days were great. There were things I had learnt before, which on learning again, reinforced and ignited ideas and actions. There were also things that were new; some I have used already and some I know that I will use in the future.

I remember a message, Aurora contributor, Sue Stockdale communicated at the very first Aurora day, Identity, Impact and Voice – “Seize opportunities, if you don’t try you don’t know.” I have said this to myself before and I have acted on it before. Maybe there is something that pushes you a little bit further when you hear it regularly and hear that other people have taken that advice with success.

I saw an amazing job advertised three days before the deadline…  I had to go for it.and I am delighted to say that I got it. I got it!

As I prepared for my new role I took on Jenny Garrett’s advice about ‘experiments and risks.’ I experiment more, making small moves to push myself and prove to myself that I got this role for a reason. I wanted to walk into my new role feeling confident.

One thing Aurora gave me which I had not had on any of my previous personal development programmes was a mentor. Knowing my Aurora mentor had signed up for the role and was specifically to support me gave me real impetus. I took control and initiated the meetings. These were some of the points that I raised: “I have a big challenge coming up and feel daunted by it.” “Something has been bugging me for a while and I don’t know how to approach it now.” “I want to be more confident when…”

The mentor meetings were hard work at times but I left each one feeling positive and energised. This really was the most useful part of Aurora for me, as it gave me time to think about the specifics and have the support of someone who was there to work with me to apply who I am and what I have learnt from Aurora and beyond, to my specific situations and aspirations.

Attending Aurora allowed me to step away from my desk and be selfish. A cornucopia of information and inspiration filled every Aurora day and related activity. Like a cross between the Charlie & the Chocolate Factory characters Augustus Gloop and Veruca Salt I took and took; from speakers, from participants and from my mentor, and I hope I gave as generously as I had taken.

The reality is that I don’t know how much of Aurora contributed directly or even indirectly to my getting the job, but I do know I will be using lots of the things I have  learnt from it for many years to come.

Hannah Phung is Project Manager (Museography) Zayed National Museum at The British Museum, a role that she took up in June.

Aurora year two begins next week and will be taking place in London, Dublin, Edinburgh, Cardiff and Sheffield, use this link for more information: Aurora